Poster Presentation Abstracts

Poster Presentations: Friday Night

Zenobia Lojewska and Jeff Gagnon: Researching Modeling of Human Motion to Improve Students’ Experience in a One Semester Survey Physics Course

Jayashree Ranga: Explain Everything – An iPad App to create online videos

Norma M. Chase: Recognizing and Engineering Routes Around the Cognitive Obstacles Encountered by Non-majors in Introductory Physics Courses

David Pritchard: Learning Experiments in a Physics Massive Open Online Course

Gary Garber: Educational Robotics Kits: LEGO EV3 vs. VEX IQ Robotics, a Comparison in Sensor Control Systems

POSTERS

Zenobia Lojewska and Jeff Gagnon
Researching Modeling of Human Motion to Improve Students’ Experience in a One Semester Survey Physics Course

lojewskz@springfieldcollege.edu

Springfield College, Springfield, MA
I studied the literature to find out how instructors are modifying their introductory physics courses taught to life science majors. The IPLS courses are restructured around biological content. In particular, the human body is often used as a theme to introduce topics in classical mechanics.
Since I teach the algebra/trigonometry based one semester Physics for Movement Science course geared toward the Exercise Science, Athletic Training and Physical Education majors, I focused my study on the application of physics to biomechanics. I will share numerous lab experiments related to human motion, which are part of our current and future curriculum for the physics labs.
Jayashree Ranga

Explain Everything – An iPad App to create online videos
jranga@salemstate.edu

Salem State University, Salem MA
In this poster user friendliness of an iPad App titled Explain Everything to create online videos will be discussed. All videos were then posted on YouTube and links were provided to students. Using YouTube Analytics section student video viewing habits were analyzed. This provided feedback on topics challenging to students. Classroom lectures were accordingly tweaked to address these challenging topics.
Norma M. Chase

Recognizing and Engineering Routes Around the Cognitive Obstacles Encountered by Non-majors in Introductory Physics Courses
norma.chase@mcphs.edu

MCPHS University – Boston, MA

How do we ensure that our introductory physics courses provide the kind of background in physics which is most critically important for students preparing for careers in medicine?   How do we also avoid terrorizing and demoralizing less experienced non-majors, whose votes will (incidentally) impact crucial funding for Physics Research and Education?   The author discusses methods for recognizing and engineering routes around some of the many cognitive obstacles encountered by non-majors, and closes by suggesting a concomitant redesign of the “standard” curriculum for non-majors.

Dave Pritchard

Learning Experiments in a Physics Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)
dpritch@mit.edu
MIT, Cambridge, MA

We report results from three treatment/control learning experiments conducted in 8.MReVx: Mechanics Review, a massive open online course (MOOC) run by the RELATE group at MIT on the edX platform. First, we compared the efficacy of deliberate practice activities intended to train individual skills  with traditional practice of solving whole problems. Two formats of deliberate practice–drag and drop and multiple choice—were used. Evaluating the learning using traditional whole problems we find that traditional practice outperforms deliberate practice in the multiple choice format. Second, we measured the amount of learning that occurs during a pretest administered in a MOOC environment that transfers to the same question placed on the posttest. We place an upper limit on the amount of such transfer that suggests that this type of learning effect is very weak compared with the learning throughout the course. Third, we show that presenting a diagram together with a problem statement affects students problem-solving behavior, and in some cases affects the probability of correctly answering the problem.

Gary Garber

Educational Robotics Kits: LEGO EV3 vs. VEX IQ Robotics, a Comparison in Sensor Control Systems

ggarber@bu.edu           

Boston University Academy, Boston, MA

I compare two introductory robotics systems, the LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 Kit and the VEX Robotics VEXIQ kit. Samples of the robots will be on display to play with along with a copy of my just released book on the LEGO EV3 kit.

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