Welcome to the AAPT-NES

6 Nov

The objective of the New England Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers is the advancement and integration of the teaching of physics at all educational levels and the furtherance of an appreciation for the role of physics in our culture. Its membership consists of those interested in the teaching of physics. NES-AAPT membership is not contingent upon membership in the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT).

Click here for more information on local meetings

August Remote Teaching Workshop

26 Jul
AAPT-NE is hosting a virtual workshop designed for secondary physics teachers 3-5 pm on August 8th. Please register using the Google Form below:
Remote teaching strategies will include but are not limited to:
  • CK-12 free online textbook, grading syncs with Google Classroom
  • EdPuzzle – documentaries and/or upload lessons and ask questions; includes online gradebook
  • Virtual Tutoring – students point their camera at their paper while they problem solve as teacher corrects their work in real time; utilizing Breakout Rooms for students to practice problem solving in partners
  • Virtual Blackboard – techniques including Zoom annotations and writing notes (use phone and a notebook as a “Whiteboard”)
  • Phet simulations including but not limited to those posted by University of Colorado and Andrew Duffy from Boston University
  • Lab Activities that can be done at home and emphasize lab analysis with Google Sheets

New book by Tom Marcella:

26 Jul

New book by Tom Marcella:

PROFESSOR EMERITUS
UMASS LOWELL

Quantum Entanglement and the Loss of Reality.

202 pages Self published
Paperback $13.95
The first chapter is available at

Quantum mechanics is all about doing experiments. But it predicts only the possible results and the probability of obtaining each result. Results and probabilities. That’s all there are! The ultimate question is, “Is this all there is to know about the quantum experiment?” Bohr answers, “Yes. If we know the results and the probability of occurrence for each result, then we know everything there is to know about that experiment. There is nothing else!””Not so,” says Einstein. “Surely, there must be more to an experiment than just results and probabilities. Obviously, quantum mechanics does not tell us the whole story.”Bell’s theorem says they cannot both be correct. There can be no quantum mechanics that embraces the tenets of classical physics. Nature has to choose one or the other. We answer the question by taking the reader from classical physics through Bell’s theorem in the context of the Bohr-Einstein debate over the meaning of reality. The classical approach of Einstein is pitted against the quantum mechanics of Bohr, common sense against the counterintuitive nature of the new theory. Entanglement is the essential characteristic of quantum mechanics that makes it different from classical theory. And with entanglement there is no reality as we know it. In particular, we discuss the EPR experiment and Bell’s theorem in detail. At the end of it all, we are forced to conclude, as did Bell, that quantum mechanics is incompatible with classical physics. Subsequent experiments confirm that local realism, as professed in classical theory, is untenable.

Spring Meeting update

26 Mar

Due to the threat posed by the coronavirus pandemic, we have decided to cancel the Spring, 2020 Meeting of the New England Section of AAPT. If you have paid the registration fee for this meeting, you will receive a refund, shortly

Spring 2020 meeting is Postponed

12 Mar

As our host site has closed down for the remainder of the semester, the spring meeting is being postponed.

Workshop: Energize your physics class with computation/modeling, April 4, Boston

25 Feb

There is a 1-day workshop on Saturday, April 4 2020, at Tufts University on integrating computation into high school and college physics courses. More information including registration can be found here:
https://www.compadre.org/PICUP/events/Boston/index.cfm  

  I speak from personal experience that you will leave the workshop having learned something that you will want to use, be it an activity with spreadsheet, a problem with Python, or just an idea to try. Please share this email with your colleagues whom you think might be interested. Early bird registration ($20) ends March 22.

Who should attend:
Any physics educators within striking distance of the Boston area that want to energize their physics courses! The scope of this workshop is appropriate for physics teachers from high schools, 2-year colleges, and 4-year colleges and universities.

The workshop will include demonstrations and discussions about various aspects of integrating computational activities into physics courses at all levels from introductory to advanced.  There will also be guided working time wherein participants will explore tested computational exercises, and will build an outline that will serve as the beginning of a plan for integrating computational activities into their specific courses. Finally, by participating in this workshop participants will become plugged into a growing and supportive community of like-minded physics educators dedicated to improving the physics curriculum. The support system includes a repository of developed computational materials as well as dedicated online and personal community support.

Best wishes,
Jay Wang
Co-organizer
Physics, UMass Dartmouth

POSTPONED: Spring Section Meeting

21 Jan

The New England AAPT Meeting will be this spring in CT.

Please use this link to submit poster or oral presentations.

or cut and paste https://forms.gle/B5ntWiRyHjVVKEiE6

  • Location:  
    • Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT
      Exley Science Center, 265 Church St, Middletown, CT

To register for the conference, register on our Wild Apricot Page.

Or paste this link: https://aapt-nes.wildapricot.org/event-3733429

  • Date
    • May 1 and 2 (Friday/Saturday), 2020
  • Host Contact:
    • Vacek Miglus, Wesleyan University

Summer Workshop in Making at M.I.T.

27 May

Screen Shot 2019-05-27 at 8.47.03 AM

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Image

Andrew Duffy receiving this year’s Janet Guernsey Award from Mark Greenman, a former awardee.

1 May

IMG_2591.jpeg

Active Learning in Introductory Physics Courses: Research-Based Strategies that Improve Student Learning

1 May
SPACES STILL AVAILABLE—EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION FEE EXTENDED TO MAY 20!

Active Learning in Introductory Physics Courses: Research-Based
Strategies that Improve Student Learning—July 15-17, 2019, Portland,
Oregon

Designed for those who teach introductory physics at universities,
colleges and high schools. Graduate credit will be available through the
University of Oregon.*

Instructors: David Sokoloff, University of Oregon and Ronald Thornton,
Tufts University

Participants will be introduced to research-validated, classroom-tested
strategies for each component of the introductory course that have been
demonstrated to improve learning. These include Interactive Lecture
Demonstration (ILDs), RealTime Physics (RTP) labs, Collaborative
Problem-Solving Tutorials, Workshop Physics (WP), Physics with Video
Analysis (PVA), and related online video analysis exercises. The course
will also include the use of video analysis to identify analytic
functions describing real data. Among other more recent developments are
(1) 3rd ed. RTP E & M labs using video analysis, (2) ILDs using
clickers, (3) online homework using Interactive Video Vignettes (IVVs),
and (4) distance learning and in class labs using the self-contained,
wireless IOLab (or other wireless data acquisition devices). Topics will
be chosen from both semesters of introductory physics. Research on the
effectiveness of these strategies will also be discussed.

The tools and software used in these active learning curricula are
compatible with Macintosh and Windows OS, and with the popular
interfaces and sensors. Participants will receive complimentary printed
copies of the curricula (published by Wiley and Vernier, and also
available for high school use as the ABP High School E-dition).

The course fee is $225. (Early bird registration until May 20 is $195.)

* Up to three graduate credits from the University of Oregon will be
available for an additional $90/credit.

For more information and to register:


Active Learning in Introductory Physics Courses

1 Apr
From: David R Sokoloff <sokoloff@uoregon.edu>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Active Learning Course Early Bird Registration Fee Ends May 1
Date: March 31, 2019 at 1:19:50 PM EDT
SPACES STILL AVAILABLE—EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION FEE ENDS MAY1!

Active Learning in Introductory Physics Courses: Research-Based
Strategies that Improve Student Learning—July 15-17, 2019, Portland,
Oregon

Designed for those who teach introductory physics at universities,
colleges and high schools. Graduate credit will be available through the
University of Oregon.*

Instructors: David Sokoloff, University of Oregon and Ronald Thornton,
Tufts University

Participants will be introduced to research-validated, classroom-tested
strategies for each component of the introductory course that have been
demonstrated to improve learning. These include Interactive Lecture
Demonstration (ILDs), RealTime Physics (RTP) labs, Collaborative
Problem-Solving Tutorials, Workshop Physics (WP), Physics with Video
Analysis (PVA), and related online video analysis exercises. The course
will also include the use of video analysis to identify analytic
functions describing real data. Among other more recent developments are
(1) 3rd ed. RTP E & M labs using video analysis, (2) ILDs using
clickers, (3) online homework using Interactive Video Vignettes (IVVs),
and (4) distance learning and in class labs using the self-contained,
wireless IOLab (or other wireless data acquisition devices). Topics will
be chosen from both semesters of introductory physics. Research on the
effectiveness of these strategies will also be discussed.

The tools and software used in these active learning curricula are
compatible with Macintosh and Windows OS, and with the popular
interfaces and sensors. Participants will receive complimentary printed
copies of the curricula (published by Wiley and Vernier, and also
available for high school use as the ABP High School E-dition).

The course fee is $225. (Early bird registration until May 1 is $195.)